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In the mid nineteenth century, the church was in a very bad state of repair. Henry Yates Jones Taylor in his biography wrote “I remember Brockworth Church when it was in such a terrible of dilapidation that the walls were supported with trunks of elm trees. During that epoch of ecclesiastical degradation, I sat in a miserable pew and saw the sunbeams dance and quiver through the crevices or fissures of the old wall, which, through neglect, were losing their pristine cohesion. The

services were cold, perfunctory and irreverent. The grandeur of the old arch solemnized the building which had a greater resemblance to a respectable barn than to a parish church sanctuary.”

 

In 1845, Thomas Fulgarries, architect, wrote a “report and estimate” which would included “re-building the west wall, Buttresses, Plinth Arches, Reframing Nave and Porch Roof and purchasing open seats.”

The minutes of the Vestry meeting for 5th June 1846 records that “The church, which is in dilapidation, being investigated, it was agreed that the repairs should forthwith take place” Mr John Hubert, who later undertook the contract, attended and produced a specification and estimate. The total sum amounted to £263 10s 5D (£29,255) and it was agreed that this be accepted and the whole was referred to the Churchwardens “That the above work be carried out”

At a further meeting on the 6th November 1846 the Vestry decided upon “taking down a portion of the tower of the said church, which is in dilapidated state, and re-building and raising the same to a higher elevation; and taking down the present pews in the said church and erect new ones in their stead, and taking down and removing the pulpit and reading desk and placing the same in a better and more convenient place in the said church, so as to afford additional accommodation for the inhabitants of the said parish attending divine Services in the said church”. Mr Niblett carried out the contract for the price of £561 4s 0d (£62,167)

Before 1848 the church had a tower with a high-pitched roof, hipped on each side. A drawing of the church from that date has recently been turned into a pen and ink study for a mug.

The tower has a peal of six bells cast in 1849 by John Taylor,

Bellfounders of Loughborough. The heaviest tenor bell, in the key of F,

weighs 13cwt.

 

Electric lighting was installed in 1929.

 

An appeal fund was launched in 1977. The resulting restoration

consisted of a new roof, repaired stonework, new altar and complete

redecoration. Completed in 1981, this work cost £24,000.

 

More recently, work has been undertaken to create a lady chapel in the south transept area and to remove pews around the font to improve access.